Cabbage Sprouts & Microgreens

According to the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry red cabbage microgreens had 40 times more vitamin E and six times more vitamin C than mature red cabbage.

Vitamin C, vitamin K, and vitamin E levels were highest among red cabbage, garnet amaranth, and green daikon radish microgreens.

WebMD Health News Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD on August 31, 2012
https://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20120831/tiny-microgreens-packed-nutrients#2
 
Crude dietary fiber samples were prepared from [sprouts of] beet, cabbage, Japanese radish, onion, and mung bean sprouts (BF, CF, RF, OF, and MF, respectively). These samples contained total dietary fiber at the levels of 814, 699, 760, 693 and 666 g/kg, respectively. To examine the effect of the dietary fibre sources on the plasma cholesterol concentration, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed on a fiber-free (FF) diet or on an FF diet supplemented with 5% or 10% dietary fiber. Dietary fiber extracted from vegetables, wood cellulose (CL), pectin (PE) and guar gum (GG) were used as the fiber sources. Compared with the rats fed on the FF diet, a significant reduction in the plasma cholesterol concentration was observed in the rats fed on BF, CF, RF, MF, PE or GG after a 21-d feeding period. Cecal acetate, n-butyrate and total short-chain fatty acids were significantly higher in the rats fed on these dietary fibers, except for CF, than in those fed on the FF diet. A negative correlation was apparent between the total dietary fiber content, hemicellulose content and pectin content of each dietary fiber source and the plasma cholesterol concentration. These results suggest that some vegetable fibers exert a plasma cholesterol-lowering effect through cecal fermentation of these fibers.
 
Biosci Biotechnol Biochem
 2000 Dec;64(12):2543-51 
Plasma cholesterol-lowering effect on rats of dietary fiber extracted from immature plants.
  Nishimura N, Taniguchi Y, Kiriyama S.